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Many people adore large dog breeds such as Labrador Retrievers and German Shepherds for their energy, athleticism and versatility. But big breeds aren’t for everyone. If you live in an apartment, have small children or aren’t strong enough to handle a canine who weighs more than 70 pounds, you may want to consider a small dog.

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By Lynn Hayner | Posted: November 20, 2014, 2 p.m. PST

Even after reading How-To books until their eyes glaze over, first-time dog owners are bound to make mistakes. As a new dog owner myself back in 1986, I floundered with dog training and communication. Suffice it to say, my first few German Shepherd Dogs were rather embarrassed to be associated with me; they’d take the lead at puppy class and I’d stumble behind.

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By Lynn Hayner | Posted: November 2, 2014, 8 a.m. PST

Almost any breed and any-sized dog can enjoy agility; dogs compete in various height divisions. Small dogs are also allowed more time to finish the course. And when big dogs like a Great Danes takes center stage, they’re crowd pleasers for sure.

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If you love the great outdoors and are looking for a dog to walk, run, hike, camp, swim or explore right alongside you, we have just the list. Many of these breeds were created for outdoor work, from the Alaskan Malamute (bred to pull sleds across harsh terrain) to the Portuguese Water Dog (who, as her name implies, prefers being wet).

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Some dog breeds are known for being incredibly intelligent. They’re quick to learn a trick, and if you’re not careful, they just might outsmart you. (And you probably wouldn’t be the first human to have that happen!)

We asked 266 veterinary professionals (including vets, techs and office managers) which breeds they deemed the brainiest.

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