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The Auvergne Pointer is a large and relatively heavy gundog, with distinctive coloration and markings. It is an important breed characteristic that the ears and the area around the eyes are black. Elsewhere on the body, blue roaning, resulting from overlapping black and white hairs, is desirable. This patterning is known as “charbonnee”, or “charcoaled”, although some Auvergnes show clearly defined black markings on a white background.… Read the full post here

This breed has an agile and athletic build. The muzzle has a distinctively concave profile and is often raised high as the dog tests the air. The Pointer is prized for its exceptional sense of smell and displays considerable 1 pace on the field, covering enormous distances. This elegant dog retains strong working instincts and requires a great deal of exercise if it is to be kept as a pet.… Read the full post here

The name of this breed points to its most obvious feature - an extravagant, cotton-fluff coat of long, white hair. The Coton de Tulear is a member of the bichon group of breeds.

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This delightful spitz breed has a striking, long coat, which must always be pure white in colour. This feature can serve to distinguish it from the miniature form of the American Eskimo, which is otherwise extremely similar.

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This nimble little dog comes in two varieties. One form, the Hairless, only has hair as a crest on its head and toes, and a plume on its tail. The Powder Puff variety is covered with long, soft hair.

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The Pekingese is a short-legged breed of dog with a characteristic rolling gait. It has a relatively compact, flattened face fringed with longer hair, which gives the impression of the dog having a mane. This breed makes a bold and alert watchdog for the home.

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Well-proportioned and squarely built, the Miniature Poodle lies between the larger Standard and the tiny Toy in size. This intelligent breed has a sporty disposition, and is easy to train.

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The German Spitz breeds are compact and squarely built, and can be distinguished essentially on the basis of size. The Spitz is protected from harsh weather by its thick coat, which varies greatly in colour and has a dense undercoat.

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The Mittel, or standard, form of the German Spitz is the third largest of the five varieties. Like the Giant, it is usually bred in solid colours, but in Britain all varieties and markings are acceptable.

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The face of this breed is a little fox-like. The outercoat is long and harsh, while the undercoat is dense and soft. The Giant German Spitz, as its name suggests, is the second largest of this German group of spitz dogs, and is bred in solid colours only.

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