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Though not all canines want to cuddle with cats, some breeds seem more likely to find a friend in felines than others. And when it happens, it’s a pretty special thing to watch — there’s nothing like seeing your cat give your dog a bath or watching your pup snuggle up with his favorite kitty.

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Rich Boucher is a dog trainer(Photo: Michael Lehmkuhle/The Advocate)

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NEWARK – Everyone has their talents. For some people it’s drawing, for others it’s shooting hoops or perhaps singing.

For Rich Boucher, it’s training dogs.

Boucher grew up with German Shepherds at his home and learned to train them using books and other resources.

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FAIRFIELD — Whenever Francis “Earl” Staples spotted someone having trouble with their dog while walking past his Rolling Hills home, he would get up from his chair and give them pointers on how better train their canine companions.

Staples, 94, who passed away March 16, should know.

He was one of the first Army dog trainers of World War II, part of a team that trained more than 5,000 dogs for sentry duty, to sniff out mines and carry messages across the battlefields of the Pacific.

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PROTECT AND SERVE

Rudy Drexler, proprietor of Rudy Drexler’s School for Dogs in Elkhart, has been working with dogs for over 50 years. For much of that time, he specialized in training dogs for perhaps the most disciplined canine calling of all: law enforcement.

Now, he uses that expertise to import and train protection dogs for private homes and businesses.

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The noble French Bulldog stands vigil next to a fire hydrant. (Clint McMahon/flickr)

The American Kennel Club has unleashed (yes) its list of the most popular dogs in NYC, in addition to specifying the most popular breeds by neighborhood. Let's examine.

The most prevalent breed in the city is the French bulldog, an adorable smush-faced feat of engineering known for its easygoing demeanor and weird little fox ears.

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Home > News > Most Popular Dog Breeds In America [PHOTOS]

(AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)

(AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)

(AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)

There’s no “pause” in the reign of America’s top dog breed.

FOX News Radio’s Chris Foster reports:

Audio clip: Listen to mp3 clip.

The American Kennel Clubs’ annual ranking is out.

And Labrador Retriever is the most popular breed in America, 24 years in a row now.

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Not long ago I wrote about the breeds I miss seeing, those that used to be more popular but no longer caught the fancy of the general public. It wasn’t an argument for those breeds to start filling the veterinary offices again — raging popularity has never been good for any breed — but rather a nostalgic yearning for the wonderful pets I saw more of at the very beginning of my veterinary career.

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"Some of you can remember the day when it wasn’t pit bulls," King earlier testified. "It was German Shepherds. They were associated with World War II and Germans and being attack dogs. That went out of style. Then it became Dobermans and Rottweilers. They were the stigmatized breed. Now it’s pit bulls."

For example, South Jordan — the major opponent to the new law — had passed a ban on pit bulls after a 1997 attack on a girl who was walking home.

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Finally! A (somewhat) definitive guide to the most overrated and underrated dog breeds:

dog chart 3

dog chart 3

(David McCandless/Knowledge is Beautiful)

This chart, from David McCandless' fascinating new book Knowledge is Beautiful, ranks 87 dog breeds and compares those rankings to the actual popularity of those breeds in the US.

The ranking is based on a number of factors: trainability, life expectancy, lifetime cost (including the price of food and grooming), and suitability for children, among others.

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Some dogs will face down a cougar or rush into a burning building to save a child. Others will duck and hide when threatened. Yes, there are small, yappy dogs that won’t run from a fight, but they lack the weight and chops to intimidate an attacker or yank a child from danger.

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